Warning: include_once(/home/antonaylward/InfoSecBlog/public/wp-content/plugins/wordpress-support/wordpress-support.php): failed to open stream: Permission denied in /home/antonaylward/InfoSecBlog/public/wp-settings.php on line 304

Warning: include_once(): Failed opening '/home/antonaylward/InfoSecBlog/public/wp-content/plugins/wordpress-support/wordpress-support.php' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/local/lib/php:/usr/local/php5/lib/pear') in /home/antonaylward/InfoSecBlog/public/wp-settings.php on line 304
best practices « The InfoSec Blog
The InfoSec Blog

The Truth About Best Practices

Posted by Anton Aylward

An article on Linked entitled 'The Truth about Practices" started a discussion thread with some of my colleagues.

The most pertinent comment came from Alan Rocker:

I'm not sure whether to quote "Up the Organisation", ("If you must have a
policy manual, reprint the Ten Commandments"),  or "Catch-22" (about the
nice "tidy bomb pattern" that unfortunately failed to hit the target), in
support of the article.

Industry-wide metrics can nevertheless be useful, though it's fatal to
confuse a speedometer and a motor.

However not everyone in the group agreed with our skepticism and the observations of the author of the article.
One asked

And Anton aren't the controls you advocate so passionately best practices? >

NOT. Make that *N*O*T*!*!*!  Even allowing for the lowercase!

"Best practices" is an advertising line of self-aggrandization invented by the Big Name Accounting Firms when operating in Consulting Mode.Information Security SWOT Analysis

The #1 Reason Leadership Development Fails

Posted by Anton Aylward

http://www.forbes.com/sites/mikemyatt/2012/12/19/the-1-reason-leadership-development-fails/
Training
I wouldn't have though, based on the title, that I'd be blogging about this, but then again one can get fed up with fed up with purely InfoSec blogs, ranting and raving about technology, techniques and ISO27000 and risk and all that.

But this does relate somewhat to security as awareness training, sort of ...

My problem with training per se is that it presumes the need for indoctrination on systems, processes and techniques. Moreover, training assumes that said systems, processes and techniques are the right way to do things. When a trainer refers to something as “best practices” you can with great certitude rest assured that’s not the case. Training focuses on best practices, while development focuses on next practices. Training is often a rote, one directional, one dimensional, one size fits all, authoritarian process that imposes static, outdated information on people. The majority of training takes place within a monologue (lecture/presentation) rather than a dialog. Perhaps worst of all, training usually occurs within a vacuum driven by past experience, not by future needs.

About Social Networking policy

Posted by antonaylward

LONDON - FEBRUARY 03: (FILE PHOTO)  In this ph...

Policy development is one of my areas of practice, so when a colleague on a mailing list asked about how to phrase policy to deal with the social networks (Facebook, Twitter, Myspace, etc.) and what the "best practices" are, I came out of my shell to reply.

(We'll skip over the oxymoron "best practices" since "Context is Everything".)

The phrase

"Use of corporate resources ..."

is a wonderful one to use to prefix just about any policy statement or justification. In one workshop on policy development that I ran someone pointed out that it applied to access to the company parking lot!

The issue here isn't "social networking", no matter how much the media and ZDNet would have you believe. It boils down to a few very clear and easy to enumerate issues: